Daniel Neyland

Daniel's interests cover issues of governance, accountability and ethics in forms of science, technology and organisation. He draw on ideas from ethnomethodology, science and technology studies (in particular forms of radical and reflexive scepticism, constructivism, Actor-Network Theory and the recent STS turn to markets and other forms of organising). His research is ethnographic in orientation. In particular he is interested in the question of how entities (objects, values, relationships, processes and also people) become of the world. Across a number of research projects Daniel has ethnographically engaged with: security and surveillance, traffic management, waste, airports, biometrics, parking, signposts, malaria vaccines, Universities, algorithms and speeding drivers. Through these projects he has looked into ontology, notions of equivalence, parasitism, the mundane, market failures, problems and solutions, deleting, value and the utility of social science. Daniel is the Principal Investigator on the MISTS project (www.marketproblems.com).
​Daniel Neyland has recently published a book on Mundane Governance, co-authored with Steve Woolgar and available from Oxford University Press.

See also:
​Milyaeva S., Neyland D. (2016). Market innovation as framing, productive friction and bricolage: an exploration of the personal data market. Journal of Cultural Economy, 1-16. http://www.marketproblems.com/uploads/2/6/2/7/26276885/milyaeva_neyland_...
Neyland D. (2016). Bearing account-able witness to the ethical algorithmic system. Science, Technology and Human Values, 41(1), 50-76. http://www.marketproblems.com/uploads/2/6/2/7/26276885/neyland_mollers_2...
Neyland D., Coopmans C. (2014). Visual Accountability, Sociological Review, 62(1), 1-23. http://www.marketproblems.com/uploads/2/6/2/7/26276885/neyland_coopmans_...
Neyland D. (2012). Parasitic Accountability, Organization, 19(6), 845-863.
Neyland D. (2012). Managing Electronic Waste: A Study of Market Failure, New Technology, Work and Employment, 27(1), 36-51.
​Upcoming publications related to MISTS here http://www.marketproblems.com/articles.html